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Us 15, Copd 10, California 10, San Bruno 9, Ntsb 5, Joe Vazquez 5, Jerry Brown 5, Glenview 5, Dana 5, Sacramento 4, Abel Maldonado 3, Ucsf 3, At&t 3, Petco 3, Allen Martin 3, Ken Bastida 3, Jane 3, Allen 3, Mcnerney 2, Sherry Hu 2,
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  CBS    CBS 5 Eyewitness News at 6PM    News  News/Business.  
   King and Martin. New. (CC)  

    September 10, 2010
    6:00 - 7:00pm PDT  

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tragedy. investigators have spent all day at the scene trying to find out what happened. this is the massive crater left behind from yesterday's explosion. at least four people tonight confirmed dead, another 50 injured, eight in critical condition. now we are told tonight close to 40 homes destroyed. today, crews were outgoing house to house with dogs searching for any more victims. last night we heard witness after witness describe that explosion. the blast was so powerful in fact that the usgs says it registered as a magnitude 1.3 earthquake at exactly 6:11 last night. a.m. allen martin is in san bruno with the
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latest. >> reporter: the national transportation safety board says it may be a year before we get answers as to what caused this explosion. this is your typical neighborhood. the streets as it looked with homes lining them right next to another. then today the section impacted by the explosion, more or less 15 acres, every home, every tree, every car is destroyed as we have seen in wildfire after wildfire all you see is a chimney here and there. one photo i saw today, all the houses on the street were gone. but still, out front in the front yard, untouched, a for sale sign that had been there before. we have heard a lot of stories from people in the neighborhood today. one man we talked to was really very, very lucky to make it out alive. ann notarangelo has the story.
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it's amazing. >> this man is an amazing story terrill and what a story he has to tell, what a storyteller. i just got off the phone with the coroner's office. they haven't been able to identify up to this point the four dead people. they are working diligently and they hope to be able to identify these people sometime later this evening. they are going to have to use dental records. 52 people are injured, among the man we have been talking about greg. he has an amazing story to tell because he lives at 100 glenview drive right where the explosion took place. wait until you hear what he has endured for the last 24 hours. all of a sudden, i was just walking and my floor completely came --wood floors went like --exploded up, threw me against the wall. after it threw me, i got up, went to the back door, and i looked at the back door and i saw my hot tub and everything was on fire, my backyard --
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flames were shooting across my backyard. i opened the door and black smoke came in and i sucked it in and i went oh, man, i'm in trouble here. >> reporter: unimaginable trouble. chopper 5 took these pictures of greg's neighborhood as it was burning. >> as i opened the front door, it exploded in my face. and i fell back and like asphalt from the ground was shooting into the house. so i slammed the door shut. >> reporter: his first thought was for his neighbor. he still doesn't know if she made it. >> i'm just thinking to myself, you can't let other people die and i'm going, but i can't do anything. so i was like freaked out. my mind was just wandering. i --i couldn't even move. i couldn't even --i was just on fire immediately. so i turned the other way and i started running up the hill. next thing i know, my feet, my shoes are melting. so i threw my shoes off. and i'm running the street, the ground is so hot and i'm just feeling myself just peeling. and then i saw my neighbor across the street holding his two little babies in his hand
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and the back of his legs were just completely burned up. and people were just all --i mean, just screaming, man. >> reporter: greg's wife mary saw the fireball from her office and she called him. >> he goes, i'm on fire, my back's on fire up! there's kids! and he is running. so i'm trying to find him. it was just chaotic. >> reporter: she didn't think greg was going to make it. >> he wanted to go back and help and i'm like, no, run. get out, run, run, run, run. >> reporter: just as loudly he was yelling back at her. >> and i kept yelling at her, don't come near here, don't get near, there is no way they are going to put this out. >> reporter: he repeated over and over how grateful he is that his wife and daughter weren't home at the time. he thinks that spared everyone. >> if anybody else was in the house, it might not have -- we might not have got out. if i were to have waited another two, three minutes, that was it. i wouldn't have got out the door because the programs that were surrounding the house all the way around.
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so -- and it was -- i don't know what -- it was a massive, massive flame and it wouldn't stop. >> reporter: they got him to the hospital where he was treated for second-and third- degree burns on his back, head and legs. and his elbows are completely burned. doctors wanted him to stay, but he chose to leave. however, now he has pain shooting from his head down his spine and was planning to go back to get it checked out. you may have noticed his t- shirt says, dream. despite this horrifying experience, he and his wife were joking with one another and they are thankful. >> everything's gone. i mean, everything we owned is completely gone. there's nothing left. and that's irrelevant, though, because people died. other people died. you know? >> reporter: it has been a very fretful painful 24 hours for family and friends who are wondering who those four people who are who are deceased. they are hoping that they will be able to provide these families with answers in the next few hours. >> that's what i'm thinking
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about. the unaccounted for. the missing persons. is there an official list at this point where people can check that? >> there is no official list because there are a lot of lists. and what happens was the red cross has called in people to assess a list. the county has a list going. the city has a list. but we did get a briefing earlier today and they said they brought in additional search-and-rescue teams including dogs. they are looking for people. they don't know who they're looking for or if there is any other person left in the rubble. early this morning they had about 25% of the area to cover, hopefully they will have that information for us. there is actually a briefing going on right now and maybe they will be able to tell us whether or not they got those last homes searched. >> ann, thanks very much. going on behind us is a live press conference right now. the national transportation safety board is here. just' moment ago, our lieutenant governor abel maldonado who is acting governor because governor schwarzenegger is out of the country in asia at this point,
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abel maldonado signed an executive order freeing up funds so people who are victims here have access to help right way. now, the big question, what caused what may turn out to be the biggest pipeline disaster in this country? ken bastida has been looking into that part of the story for us. kept what did you find out? >> >> reporter: first a quick undate. some eos, urban search and very excuse teams have been released from the area and with that we have new information that the number of homes of destroyed now according to the state is at 37. so that's a bit of an adjustment there. 37 homes destroyed. this is the end of the line for most people. they can't get past san bruno avenue at crestmoor drive. but when they do get home, whether it's tonight or over the weekend, they are going to have the same question on their minds, who is responsible for unleashing this hell in their neighborhood? reporter: investigators got their first look today at the origin of the deadly blast that left a crater the size of a house. the gas line that ruptured is big enough for an adult to crawl through.
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30" wide and containing volatile natural gas under pressure more than 1,000 pounds per square inch. this is where the pipeline ruptured. a pipeline that surrounds this entire neighborhood. it can be seen on this national pipeline mapping system schematic. actually a system of high pressure lines bordered by interstate 280 on the northwest, skyline boulevard on the east. the 30" section that blew thursday was a connector line that ran right under the intersection of glenview and estates drives. >> it's a big problem. it's a really big problem and it grows every day. >> reporter: rick kessler with the pipe safety trust, the national group that monitors pipelines nationwide, says unbelievably, federal law only requires 7% of these lines to be inspected. catastrophic events like this should not surprise anyone. >> we need to make a leap from the victorian age into the 21st century when it comes to pipeline regulation.
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citizens and local governments have a right to know about these pipelines, where they are what they're made of, what their safety record is, what the enforcement record against them is, and when things break, when are they fixed, how are they fixed. >> reporter: kessler says people need to be vigilant with local utility companies and report all leaks of gas smells immediately. but people in this neighborhood told us they have been smelling gas and pg&e knew about it. >> pg&e notified us about a year ago that they were going to test all of the gas lines up and down the street. so they just said they are going to drill holes in the ground and then refill them. i'm thinking maybe do they know something was going on? >> somebody calls in and says there is a smell of gas, then we immediately try to respond and get out. so again, i know that there's been news reports, people had called in. we're trying to confirm that. >> reporter: a sacramento attorney who investigated a similar deadly gas explosion in
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a rancho cordova neighborhood in 2008 says their investigation uncovered an aging archaic system of pipelines dating back to the 1950s, rife with corrosion problems and packed with the potential for extreme failure. >> the old adage if it ain't broke don't fix it doesn't apply when you're dealing with these corrosive type pipes that are over 60 years old, the type of welding that was used at the time was not now the state-of-the-art and that has a tendency to corrode and burst and air travel natural gas into various pockets causing explosions just like this. >> reporter: pg&e released a statement today allen saying that they are working with the ntsb to just try to determine the last time these pipes were inning respected. they are not sure about that right now. what he found a may 18 report from the ntsb that cited pg&e for being in violation of federal inspection regulations, specifically that their field
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reps, the people who go into neighborhoods like this all over california to check for gas leaks, were not being adequately trained. pg&e would only say that they are still investigating. but you can believe the people that return home to this neighborhood are going to want some answers. we'l try to get them. allen? >> you think of hundreds of miles of pipelines in the state. that's a risk. the ntsb said it may take a year to get the cause and they focus on the cause not the blame but i'm thinking people really need to know who is at fault here. >> reporter: this is their whole life, their homes, their neighborhood. you saw the pictures. it's complete devastation. this is one case in one neighborhood in america. think about the aging infrastructure in this country. we know about bridges that are falling down, about roadways that are not safe. what about those utilities
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right under our homes? should somebody be checking that? that's what people want to know. >> ken bastida, thank you. and just to reiterate, the press conference that's going on behind me, offers of emergency services, is now telling us 37 homes have been destroyed. that number lower than what we were told earlier in the day and certainly last night. also, they are telling us that despite their searches, using the dogs and everybody through that neighborhood today, they have found no more victims. so we know that there are four people confirmed dead as a result of this. undoubtedly this disaster put the emergency crews to the test last night. and we certainly got a lot of e- mails from people wondering in our pictures, our live pictures, why aren't fire crews moving in? why aren't they fighting the fire? don knapp shows us things were really out of their control for a while. don. >> reporter: there is no question about how quickly firefighters jumped on this. in fact, this one firehouse just within blocks of ground zero, those firefighters were there right away.
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when they got there they said what can we do? this is overwhelming. and really what they had to do was wait for pg&e crews to turn off the pipe. the gas line pipe. and that took about an hour to an hour and a half. >> reporter: within minutes of the first call at 6:12:00 p.m., firefighters were on the scene facing the fiercest flames they had ever seen. >> i have been in the service for 31 years, never seen anything like it. >> reporter: 18 minutes later the fire had gone to 6 alarms. crews from at least 20 other fire departments including san francisco international airport, half moon bay and alameda came to fight. they were at a disadvantage. >> we used everything we had. we had foam. we had water. at one point we said we just tried to contain flames, tried to just keep it in a plume and that was our objective and obviously, it was so powerful, it blew right through our streams. >> reporter: it took pg&e crews as long as an hour and a half, says chief dennis haag to turn offer the 70 to 100-foot flames from the high pressure gas line buried just three feet
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underground. >> we tried to knocked fire down. obviously when you get that much heat, sometimes you're not going to be successful, we pulled back to be sure no one got hurt and to protect anything we can credit. >> reporter: pg&e crews worked fast to shut down a major delivery and smaller distribution lines. but the blast also ripped out a wart line cutting the fire department's supply. >> it put a delay but all in all we didn't have success with the fire. so we adjusted our units to keep exposures down and waited for the flame to be put out. >> reporter: despite the obstacles and delays neighbors generally praised the response. >> police and fire, it was almost instantaneous. i thought they were superb. >> reporter: jim says firefighters came together and did a marvelous job. >> no one in the world is prepared to fight this unless you're ready for a carpet bomb with napalm because in the
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photos right here, this looks apocalypse now. it just -- that's the way it was. you can't -- no one can prepare for this. no one. >> reporter: california's mutual aid system is part of the story. now, they had about 170 firefighters, 50 or 60 pieces of equipment and the way it works is computer assisted dispatch they treat the whole county as a single fire department as each alarm came in the computer automatically called in the next nearest companies and in the end they had just about everybody over here huge numbers 170 firefighters plus, and about 50, 60 pieces of gear. allen? >> all right. i think most people would say they did a hell of a job. don knapp, thanks so much. i'm else to joe vazquez and his videographer were given an exclusive walk through of the burn area. we are talking about the streets where home after home after home are now gone. the only thing left, foundations and chimneys. so between going to get that video to you just as soon as we can but an exclusive look at
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the burn area. for the survivors, the coming days and weeks will be very, very tough and emotional. today lieutenant governor abel maldonado signed an executive order freeing up funds that will make that money available right away. that's going to make things easier for them. but sherry hu talked to a family and even though they got out, they lost everything they had. >> reporter: they have. they ran out with nothing. it is dinnertime at the evacuation center. there are still tons of people here although many of them are volunteers. one thing will change, no cots tonight. that's because evacuees who need a place to stay will be put up in hotels. many of them have been here practically all day. they are certainly anxious and want to know when they can go home provided it's still standing. reporter: nelson alvarado couldn't get home after work last night. and now he may not have a home at all. >> the explosion was three houses down from our house. so --
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>> reporter: his parents and extended family may be homeless, all 11 of them. it is simply overwhelming. >> can't really think straight. i don't know --i really don't know. i don't know what to do. i don't know what to think. >> reporter: judy escaped with only her life. >> the fireball at the corner coming at me so i just ran. >> reporter: she lived in her san bruno home for 40 years and she too waits to hear if it's still standing. >> just nervous and trying to do the best we can. it will be fine. >> not knowing if my childhood is completely gone or if it's still there, like the family heirloom. >> it's hard. we used to catch the bus on the corner. that's not there anymore. and you know, did we just --we grew up there and riding our bikes all over the place an it's not there anymore. >> reporter: irma is shell shocked, too.
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>> burning infer no. literally burning inferno. >> reporter: she believes her home is spared but won't believe it until she see it is with her own two eyes. >> we weren't hurt in any way physically. but emotionally and spiritually, it's been devastating. >> reporter: no more donations for tonight. people have been so generous, bringing food, dog beds, clothes, diapers, everything you can imagine. the evacuees also are being given things like gift certificates, free phones, whatever they need to start that road to recovery. i just want to show you, i know you have been talking about lists. this is what a lot of the evacuees have been waiting for all day. it is the specific list the exact address of those 37 homes that were destroyed. there are also ones that are listed with major and minor damage here. so at the end of the day, for a lot of these families, they are going to get good news, for others not so good. >> thank you, sherry hu. so dana, we have had stories so
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far, stories of loss and survival stories of heroes and one bit of good news that came out of the press conference behind me as i'm told that as soon as -- maybe tomorrow, some of these folks might be able to get back into their homes. >> that will be great. all right, allen. we are going to be getting back to you in just a few minutes. when our coverage from san bruno continues, sherry hu touched on it. the generosity and outpouring of support from the kind hearted people across the bay area. and what about pets? we saw this one last night rescued. what services are being offered for them? and for any of you who would like to offer some kind of assistance, ways you can help. we'll have that after the break. ,,,,,,
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you inhale, they inhale. millions of children continue to be exposed to secondhand smoke. secondhand smoke causes asthma, a disease that cannot be cured. protect your loved ones. but what really happened? cnn -- not me --
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cnn says his assertion about his tax record was "just plain wrong." jerry brown went out there and took credit for the fact that the people of california voted for proposition 13, which lowered taxes, which he opposed. and now he's going around taking credit for it. he raised taxes as governor of california. he had a surplus when he took office and a deficit when he left. he doesn't tell the people the truth. last night blood centers of the pacific put out an urgent
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request for blood donations, specifically "o" negative. and the response they said was overwhelming. but tonight blood centers of the pacific has a new request for those who want to donate. >> friends family and strangers waiting for hours to donate blood. kitchen watched their parents give. >> a lot of people got very hurt from the fire. and like they need blood. >> we haven't seen it this busy since 9/11 nine years ago. >> reporter: so many feeling so compelled to help. >> this is just a way to, you know, pay back the community a little bit. >> i just saw on the news that they were calling for donation. and i decided it was a good thing to do. >> reporter: last night the blood centers of the pacific put out the urgent call for "o" negative blood. it can be given to anyone in an emergency especially burn
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patients. because of their burns, patients lose essential fluids. >> it's really important that they are just sustained with fluids with blood, especially the liquid portion of blood, which is plasma. >> reporter: bags of "o" negative poured in from ucsf from blood banks as far away as north dakota, arkansas, albuquerque. 94 units of blood pre-screened and ready for use. all of us in the bay area now donating blood are replenish, supplies especially "o" negative for all bay area hospitals. the response is so tremendous, so great, blood banks have a new request. >> it is so packed though right now that we're actually asking people to postpone their donations and to donate blood next week and the weeks coming. we are going to need to replenish this blood that's being used right now the. >> reporter: to keep on giving in the weeks and months to come. now, of course, pets are also affected by this disaster. in fact, last night we saw a group of firefighters able to bring a dog out of one home in
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particular. so we know there are pets that have survived. animal care centers are coming together offering free care to pets and strays. peninsula humane society, the petco store in san bruno tanforan, they are going to provide kennels for dogs and cats. petco was working with the red cross yesterday taking animals from the site to the store. now, if you want more information, the petco number 650-589-3757. or you can visit the humane society website peninsulahumanesociety.org. people didn't have a lot of time to d anything. there are strays out there and people want them back. >> we'll talk to you in a bit, allen. thank you. we are going to move on to this just in to our newsroom. this is a close-up look at the destruction in san bruno. joe vazquez joins us live with an exclusive walk-through of the blast zone. joe, i can't even begin to imagine what you saw. >> reporter: it's pretty bad. let me just set the scene for
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you. down there, that's sneath and skyline, you can see folks gathered. that's about as close as most people are able to get to. get closer requires about a mile nature hike and we just completed that hike. let me show you the pictures. you know, it is utter devastation down there. you see one after another homes with their windows blown out, cars are in some cases indistinguishable and in some cases the garages have collapsed on top of them. that -- these are the homes on crestview very close to that crater. and, you know, from what we can tell, it looks like perhaps three or four homes deep on the south side of the crater were completely destroyed. and then as you climbed up the hill, further south, it looked like, you know, a little bit of damage, a little less, a little less, and then as we got up to about the sixth up house, the 7th house we talked to a man who just inspected his home and said everything is fine. but boy, the close-up pictures right there by that crater, it just gives you a look at -- at
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the impact, i mean that very deep crater shows you, you know, exactly how much -- that concrete just blew out there and then the damage from the intense heat of the fire just really wreaked havoc on the homes that were nearby. if it's any consolation, it appears that, you know, it was just those homes perhaps a handful and we were just on the south side of it perhaps five or six homes on each side of the street were just completely blown out. then as i say, as you get a little further away, it looks like there is less and less damage. >> now, we show these pictures not in an attempt to take advantage of the situation but simply it's information for people who are watching who may have loved ones whose homes were there, are there, it's just additional information for people. >> reporter: i can't tell you how many people are just desperate for knowledge right now. was my home affected? they did release the names and addresses there at the news conference a little while ago but it's been 24 hours and you
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know, people are beside themselves right now wanting to know whether their homes are safe. and that's our first look. they are going to let some more reporters and photographers from other stations in shortly after that news conference. >> yeah. with the light of day, it's exactly what we feared it would look like. so joe, thank you very much for that exclusive look. all right. and we'll be right back. ,,,,,,,,
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as governor, he cut waste got rid of the mansion and the limo budgets were balanced. $4 billion in tax cuts. world class schools and universities. clean energy promoted. 1.9 million new jobs created. california was working. i'm jerry brown. california needs major changes. we have to live within our means; we have to return power and decision making to the local level-closer to the people and no new taxes without voter approval. jerry brown the knowledge and know-how to get california working again.
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year of waiting before official following a christmas eve 2008 gas line explosion near sacramento, there was a full year of waiting before official investigations were completed. so if there is a lesson from that disaster, it's that solid answers take time. regardless, the investigation in san bruno is under way tonight. ken bastida shows us what those
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investigators face. >> reporter: well, dana, did it did take a long time in -- it did take a long time in sacramento to sort through that incident and the hope here by neighbors is obviously they can come to some sort of conclusion sooner. investigators got their first look at the site where that pipeline exploded and left a crater the size of a house. the gas line that ruptured is big enough for an adult to crawl through. 30" wide and containing volatile natural gas under pressure more than 1,000 pounds per square inch. this is where the pipeline ruptured. a pipeline that surrounds this entire neighborhood. it can be seen on this national pipeline mapping system schematic. actually a system of high pressure lines bordered by interstate 280 on the northwest, skyline boulevard on the east. the 30" section that blew thursday was a connector line that ran right under the intersection of glenview and estates drives.
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an attorney who investigated that same deadly gas explosion in sacramento in 2008 said their investigation uncovered an ar cake system of pipelines dating back to the 1950s. >> the old adage if it ain't broke don't fix it doesn't apply when you're dealing with these corrosive type pipes that are over 60 years old. the type of welding that was used at the time was not now the state-of-the-art. and that has a tendency to corrode and burst, causing explosions just like this. >> reporter: pg&e says it is still looking into the age of the pipelines. i'm the last time it was inspected. they are not sure about that. it says it's cooperating with federal investigators including the ntsb. they had a lot to say down below at the command post. and that's where allen martin is standing by. allen. >> reporter: all right, ken. we're here at the media headquarters here where several people, the press conference is
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just wrapped up, we are gathering that information but i can tell you that they are now saying 37 houses have been destroyed. but we also know that four people are dead, a number of others are hospitalized and that's where ann notarangelo can come in and update us. a lot of these people in the hospital are burn victims. >> reporter: yes, 52 people sent to area hospitals, 15 of those were taken by ambulance the others got there on their own. the most serious burn victims have been sent to saint francis memorial hospital in san francisco. that's where they are the bothin burn center the only dedicated burn center in the bay area. the hospital isn't talking about these stations, only to say that three of them are critical conditions, with life- threatening injuries. they have burns over 50% of their bodies. another patient has been burned over 40% of their body and all of these burns seems to be primarily above the waist. the patient who was burned over 40% of the body, that is the only patient who has been able
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to talk to doctors. they were brought to the hospital last night after the explosion. they have a long road ahead of them. of course, as allen was mentioning, they are also confirming as we have, four deceased but they are still looking for the possibility that there might be more survivors or that there might be more victims. earlier we got a briefing from fema. let's listen to that. >> amazingly, the unfortunate tragic numbers of four confirmed fatalities remains the same despite extensive work as we told you at our last press conference that we brought in two urban search-and- rescue teams, we had 12 k-9 times up there searching and so far, we have not found any additional fatalities. >> reporter: a lot of work ahead for the search-and-rescue teams. we are just told that six more search-and-rescue teams have been called in for tomorrow. they will continue their search
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looking for victims. and, you know, if there is a prayer that there could be some survivors, meanwhile at the hospitals, allen, of course the long work for those patients continues. the doctor was saying that by sunday, he will know how these patients will fare long term. of course, even best-case scenario it's a tough road. >> for the people who survived and their homes are still okay, we heard today a little bit of good news for them in that maybe tomorrow they can go back into the neighborhood. >> reporter: exactly. they were saying you know -- nobody wants to promise anything. but there are still so many literally hot spots, it's still so hot, but they are thinking maybe in the perimeter areas that were not as badly damaged maybe they can let some of the residents in. >> we saw some of that video from joe vazquez tonight. thank you, ann notarangelo. dana, that's the latest from here. >> all right. well, when we come back, our coverage from san bruno is going to continue. we have just received video from ground zero. we are going to show you that crater after this break. ,,,, 3q
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as it was yesterday, chopper five is above the scene and what you are looking at
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right now is the pipe that started it all. that pipe is large enough for a man to crawl through, 30" in diameter. that's what blew yesterday and caused the disaster of proportions that we are just now seeing today. that's the crater, that's the epicenter of this disaster. we have joe vazquez on the ground. he has exclusive -- an exclusive look at the scene in the neighborhood from glenview driver which is again the epicenter of the disaster. 15 acres, homes that have been incinerated. let hear from joe. [ pause ] >> this is what joe shot for us. we have lost his signal. but joe was allowed in to walk through this neighborhood. block by block. what he witnessed is
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apocalyptic as you can see. things are melted. they are beyond description some of them. homes that have just turned to dust. there are investigators in there, the ntsb is here. the office of emergency services is in there. last night, 170 firefighters from all over the bay area battled this blaze. initially, it was even unknown what they were facing. but what it turned out to be was a pipeline disaster. pg&e is in as well on the ground and investigating. we have our reporters all over this story. we are going to come back in just a moment with more from san bruno.
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b-a-c-c-a-l-a-u-r-e-a-t-e. baccalaureate. correct. [ audience groans ] since this competition has been continuing for 48 hours and we have yet to eliminate anyone,
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it is the decision of this board to declare all 20 contestants winners. you have all competed admirably. admirably. a-d-m-i-r-a-b-l-y. admirably. [ male announcer ] at&t is making high speed internet affordable for only $14.95 a month with select services. at&t. rethink possible. no one fights harder than jerry mcnerney. when some vets were forced to travel hours for care, mcnerney fought for a new v.a. medical facility, and won. mcnerney took on washington gridlock, to improve care for vets with traumatic brain injuries. his plan became law. that's why vfw state commander dave norris endorsed mcnerney. i'm jerry mcnerney, and i'm honored to approve this message. thanks, dad.
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in breaking news, church is showing us a picture here of san bruno. massive flames an smoke coming out of the san bruno area. this is coming in so fast, we just have the picture, we don't have any information. if you know what it is, email us. >> that was just after 6:15 last night. our helicopter was on its way back from hercules. and even from that distance, the size of the fire and the fireball was shocking! a little over 24 hours now later, and what we can show you to the house, the property damage in san bruno, we're going to get a before and after look at this devastated neighborhood. as we zoom in, well, all the homes that were there yesterday, this is today. a bomb is a comparison that most people are using this evening. the section impacted by the
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explosion is roughly 15 acres. every home, every tree, every car destroyed. home owners reeling from this tragedy should be turning to their insurance companies right now who help start the process of getting back on their feet. in fact, most home owners should be statewide to an immediate infusion of cash. reporter: people who saw their homes go up in flames last night have a lot to worry about. but insurance expert amy boch said they shouldn't worry about who is going to pay the bill. >> this kind of damage, fire, is really the --the core of a home owner's insurance policy. it's the one thing you can almost always be sure is covered. >> reporter: she says if pg&e is found to be responsible, the utility will also have to help home owners. >> for most people, there will be two sources of money for the repairs and the rebuilding. >> reporter: home owner deductibles in fire case are generally small, usually about $500 or $1,000. the first step now for home
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owners is to contact their insurance company. five insurers have already set up mobile offices at san bruno city park. >> we did with the housing relocation. >> reporter: betty and bill were there today starting the claim process. they got an immediate payment of $5,000 from travelers insurance. most home owner policies cover living expenses like motel, food and transportation if your home is uninhabitable. the insurance company should offer it to you immediately after a disaster. but if not, policyholders should ask for funds. now, we have put some more tips and resources for home owners who have insurance questions. it's on our website, cbs5.com. it turned out to be a pretty decent day around the bay area. what about the weekend? will we see that sunshine? we'll talk about that coming up next. ,,
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the guys who drive a heavy duty truck, have some heavy duty demands. like enough horsepower and torque to get out of just about any situation. a payload that beats the other guys flat out. a frame sturdy enough to bear up a max towing capacity that's over 10 tons. and a braking system tough enough to bring it all to a stop. heavy duty demands? gentlemen, your truck is ready. but what were the results? fact: brown promised to improve schools. but the drop out rate increased 50%, and the state had to take over the schools. fact: the city controller found employees paid for 22,000 hours... they never worked.
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fact: brown promised to cut crime. but murders doubled, making oakland the 4th most dangerous city in america. jerry brown. he just can't deliver the results california needs now. what are you doing, friending somebody? yeah. you got time for that? you got time to earn more on your savings, online at capitalone.com. that's new school banking, baby! instead of earning squatootski... your savings will be earning three times the national average. now, let's review. capital one interestplus savings... at three times more. go to capitalone.com. what's in your wallet? are you a pisces?
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worthy cause. dr. kim
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some other news. in fact, tonight a live one hour telecast packed with musicians, actors and athletes will raise money for a worthy cause. dr. kim mulvihill reports on how the "stand up 2 cancer" fundraiser aims to help bay area scientists find better, less toxic treatments. >> all the children... >> reporter: 12 years ago, jane lee of piedmont got the terrifying news. >> and 1998, i went for a routine exam and they found a small lump in my left breast. >> reporter: in 2004, jane first told us her story. she had advanced breast cancer, surgery and chemotherapy couldn't stop it. but a new treatment developed in the bay area did. >> you know, the longer i live, the more beautiful life becomes. >> reporter: the drug? a targeted therapy called herceptin, individualized for her type of breast cancer. that was then. this is now. >> life is wonderful! each day is wonderful. >> reporter: thanks to this
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high-tech miracle, jane's cancer is manageable. >> you learn to live with it, grow old with it, and tell your grandchildren about it. >> reporter: herceptin was developed by biotech giant genentech in south san francisco. the drug only works in roughly 25% of patients diagnosed with breast cancer. they share a unique genetic glitch. herceptin targets that glitch and blocks the cancer from growing. >> what's dramatic to me is to see how very different the treatment and approach to cancer is now than when i trained. >> reporter: ucsf chancellor is a medical oncologist who helped to develop herceptin at genentech. she says it's now defined by its unique biology. >> we have many more therapies that are targeted for patients today. >> reporter: but there is an emerging problem. cancers can become resistant to treatment, even targeted therapies. >> the cells clearly have out
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witted the treatment that we have. >> reporter: ucsf's dr. hope belongs to one of the dream team's funded by "stand up 2 cancer." the goal? to better understand how breast cancer learns to outsmart even the targeted therapies. if the dream team succeeds -- >> we could potentially restore sensitivity and kill the cancer more effectively. >> they are collaborating with scientists from other institution. >> reporter: cbs evening news anchor katie couric is a driving force behind stand up tocancer. she believes because these teams collaborate they will unlock the mysteries of cancer more quickly but in these uncertain economic times the teams are in desperate need of funding. >> it's an opportunity for to us stay as a nation, you know, we're mad as hell, we're not going to particular it any more, and we're going to move science forward so we can save more lives. >> dr. rugo hopes one day all patients with advanced cancer can live like jane and treat kansas a manageable chronic disease. >> we don't cure heart disease
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most the of the time. we don't cure diabetes or high blood pressure. but we treat it effectively. >> reporter: as for jane? >> my personal dream is that we will all be able to live a normal life. >> reporter: with time to stop and smell the roses. dr. kim mulvihill, cbs 5 healthwatch. >> stand up to cancer begins tonight at 7:00. it is commercial-free and you can view it right here on cbs 5. we are going to turn to lawrence now. the weekend is upon us. hoping for some sunshine. >> i think we are going to get it. we'll see sun around the bay area. had a little today and a good sight to see and indeed we'll see more sunshine through the weekend. let's take you live outside right now and check things out. there it is. there is the sun looking good inland right now. still a couple of patches of fog creeping in along the coastline but we are trying to clear that out a bit. temperatures around the bay area a little cool toward the beaches. a bit of a sea breeze there so we have 60s at the immediate coast. but you know what? sunshine keeping the
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temperatures warm inside the bay. we have some 70s and low 80s. yeah, plenty of 80s showing up in the interior valleys. still we have high pressure sitting off the coastline, rather weak ridge not much to it here but you have all this moisture up to the north. that's eventually going to play a factor in our weather but right now planning on lots of sunshine, a couple of patches of fog at the coast, something to worry about though, dense fog at the beaches so be careful head there is in the morning hours. tomorrow morning we are picking up on that on our computer models. out toward the beaches pretty thick early on but toward the afternoon a lot of sunshine allowing the temperatures to warm up a few degrees around parts of the bay area. let's plan on temperatures coastside running up into the 60s. you get inside the bay, 70s and 80s. east bay temperatures going to be warming up quite a bit as you will see temperatures near 90 well inland, 70s in toward berkeley and oakland. and as you look toward the north bay those temperatures running up mainly in the 70s and 80s. so looking out over the next couple of days, we are going to see some sunshine and warm temperatures inland. and cooling slightly at the coast into sunday.
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more cooling as we head in toward the middle of this week, but brief warming possibly on thursday. but as we look toward next weekend, yeah, there's even a slight chance of showers. we'll have more news when we come back. ,,,, you inhale, they inhale. millions of children continue to be exposed to secondhand smoke. secondhand smoke causes asthma, a disease that cannot be cured. protect your loved ones.
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but with advair, i'm breathing better. so now, i can join the fun and games with my grandchildren. great news! for people with copd, including chronic bronchitis, emphysema, or both, advair helps significantly improve lung function. while nothing can reverse copd, advair is different from most other copd medications because it contains both an anti-inflammatory and a long-acting bronchodilator, working together to help you breathe better. advair won't replace fast-acting inhalers for sudden symptoms and should not be used more than twice a day. people with copd taking advair
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may have a higher chance of pneumonia. advair may increase your risk of osteoporosis and some eye problems. tell your doctor if you have a heart condition or high blood pressure before taking advair. i had fun today, grandpa. you and me both. if copd is still making it hard to breathe, ask your doctor if including advair will help improve your lung function for better breathing. get your first full prescription free and save on refills.
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before we go tonight, we want to take another look inside the disaster zone. joe vazquez and his cameraman were able to get inside and view for us from glenview drive exactly what that looked like now in the light of day. so before we go, we want to also check in one last time with allen martin, who is at the command center with the last update. >> reporter: you know, dana, that video shows us exactly why it was such an emotional day for survivors in this neighborhood. we were told the good news is that the search teams that went in and went through the rubble and the debris of what's left, we now know 37 homes destroyed. the good news is they did not find any more victims today. they will search again tomorrow for what they didn't get to today. the other good news is ought
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burn victims are in the hospital all being cared for getting the best care possible. all burn victims are in the hospital. word that tomorrow the people who have been evacuated, they have been shut out of their neighborhoods, possibly tomorrow they will get to go back and hopefully find their homes still there. this is chopper 5 as we take a look at what has happened to this neighborhood in the past 25 hours right now. and dana, it's just incredible. it's like -- i hate to keep comparing it to a combat zone but that's exactly what it looks like and the force of that explosion as we heard registered almost like a 1.3 earthquake. >> it's been exceptionally devastating to see this today. we also want to in light of the victims who are in the hospital, we want to also comment on the firefighters who were injured. we want to remember them as well for their effort last night. see you at 10:00 and 11:00. [ woman on tv ] if you won't let me in,
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you can't really love me. i know about gayle. i don't know what you're talking about. if you just tell me what happened... [ ding ] [ man ] 35th and archer. next stop hamilton. [ brakes hiss ] ♪ [ male announcer ] now you can watch hit tv shows on your iphone when you get at&t u-verse tv.
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as governor, he cut waste got rid of the mansion and the limo budgets were balanced. $4 billion in tax cuts. world class schools and universities. clean energy promoted. 1.9 million new jobs created. california was working. i'm jerry brown. california needs major changes. we have to live within our means; we have to return power and decision making to the local level-closer to the people and no new taxes without voter approval.